George Siemens is quoted as saying that e-learning is the marriage of technology and education.  The video below is a parody/re-enactment that is all too common. When a lecturer decides it’s time for e-learning, what processes should be in place to deliver effective experiences?

2 Comments

  1. I watched this video and whilst I can see its point it stinks of a ‘high priesthood’ of e-learning providers.

    People approach a problem with their biases in place. This person had a closed mind and will walk away seeing the e-learning provider as an obstacle to what they see as a perfectly reasonable goal.

    This lecturer needs to be taken on a journey by the e-learning provider, that would start with giving the guy what he wanted to break down the initial barriers and establish a relationship and then taking them on a prolonged journey to enlightenment.

  2. Hi Steven

    Thanks for your comment!

    I agree the designer in this was being self-righteous and should have done a better job of explaining why slapping up a poor quality talking head video is detrimental. I felt that was one of the points: bridges need to be built.

    However, I think if the designer had just published the long, poor quality lecture video and the instructor felt that by doing so he’d ticked the e-learning box, not only would an opportunity be lost for the instructor to better understand e-learning – but the learners who are supposed to be at the centre of teaching and e-learning design would suffer.

    I really believe it is better to have no e-learning than poor quality experiences that are going to disengage and frustrate learners. My previous post on why the VET sector is disillusioned with e-learning shows what happens when people rush in to use a new technology or set of technologies. Learning outcomes suffer and the tool is blamed.

    Cheers

    KerryJ

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